DIY TREATMENT
EQUIPMENT SETUP

HOW-TO GUIDE

ELECTRICAL

Determine which electrical outlets will be used to provide electricity for the heater. Each wall plug circuit is probably 15 amps and will supply power for one heating element.

Do not use more than one wall outlet per room for the heater. All wall outlets in a room could be on the same circuit.

Bathroom outlets, GFCI counter-level outlets in the kitchen, microwave, and refrigerator outlets are good sources of electricity.

Utilize additional power from a kitchen, a sec- ond room, or a bathroom.

Bathroom GFCI outlets are generally 20 amps. Two cords can be plugged in here.

GENERAL TREATMENT

  • Allow airspace between furniture and walls. Position furniture slightly away from the walls for better airflow around the room.
  • Make sure the fan and heater create a circular airflow around the room. Do not have the fans blowing towards each other.
  • Any furniture sitting directly on the floor needs to be slightly raised or moved during the treatment to eliminate cold spots that do not reach lethal temperatures.
  • Separate mattress and box spring for optimal airflow around each piece.
  • While heating, prevent heated air from escaping the treatment area. Cover HVAC vents, bathroom exhaust fans, and wall air conditioners with tape or plastic. Two-inch blue painter’s tape is recommended and will not leave a sticky residue.
  • Cover window panes with towels or other insulating material to minimize heat loss. Block any gaps under doors with rolled towels.
  • It is best to direct treatment air at a mattress, box spring, and headboard. These items will not be damaged by heated air.
  • Unplug all electronic items and leave them in the treatment area. Do not direct heated air directly at electronics.
  • Remove any items that you would not leave in your car on a hot summer day. Plants, candles, lighters, fresh fruit or vegetables, candies, prescription medicine, and pets including fish.
  • Keep your refrigerator running, even if it is in the treatment area.

ELECTRICAL

  • Determine which electrical outlets will be used to provide electricity for the heater. Each wall plug circuit is probably 15 amps and will supply power for one heating element.

  • Do not use more than one wall outlet per room for the heater. All wall outlets in a room could be on the same circuit.

  • Utilize additional power from a second room.

  • Bathroom outlets, GFCI counter-level outlets in the kitchen, microwave, and refrigerator.

  • outlets are good sources of electricity.

  • Bathroom GFCI outlets are generally 20 amps.

  • Plug a PTAC converter into the air conditioner outlet. PTAC provides 40 amps @ 120V.

  • 4 heater cords can be plugged into a PTAC outlet converter.

GENERAL TREATMENT CONTINUED

Clothes lying on the floor or boxes in closets act as insulators. They are difficult to heat sufficiently unless they are periodically moved during the heat treatment.

Leave clothes and bedding in the treatment area and place them in mesh bags or open-weave plastic baskets. Clothes and bedding can also be placed in the dryer for one hour or more on high heat.

It is best to hang blankets and bedspreads from the corners of a door inside the treatment area.

Open all drawers and separate items so air can more easily circulate.

Vinyl blinds may sag or warp if not removed.

Always check for fire sprinklers inside the treatment area. Use sprinkler covers to protect sprinkler heads during treatments.

DOWNLOAD OUR PRINTER-FRIENDLY DIY TREATMENT EQUIPMENT SET-UP